Edward E. Miller

Edward, aged 22, was sent to Western Australia as a convict aboard the Marion, in January 1852 after being sentenced to 7 years transportation for house burglary. He was almost immediately granted a Ticket of Leave and set about looking for a space to set up a studio in March 1852. It seems he had been…

Frederick Herbert

His foray into professional photography appears to be short lived, with only one advertisement in the Inquirer & Commercial News, on 21 October 1857.  His studio was situated on Howick Street, and he may have found too much competition with the popular J. Manning, whose studio was also in the same street.

Alfred Perkins Curtis

Alfred arrived in the Swan River colony aboard the Eglinton in 1852.  He married Martha Hannah Ougden in Perth on 16 August 1856 and it was through her brother-in-law, Samuel Scriven Evans, that Alfred got into the photography business. Initially a School Master for Perth Boys School, Alfred set up a studio in 1858 in rooms near…

Duryea Brothers

Townsend & Sanford Duryea were two American born brothers who immigrated to Australia for the gold rush of the 1850’s. Townsend arrived in 1852 and his brother followed him to Melbourne in 1854. But they quickly sold their mining equipment and went into the photographic business opening a number of studios in Melbourne, Geelong and…

Samuel Scriven Evans

Being a remote outpost on the other side of a busier east coast hindered the amount of photographers who visited Perth and it wasn’t until the 1850’s that permanent studios started to pop up. New Yorker, Samuel Scriven Evans appears to be the first, arriving at Fremantle, on 15 January 1853 in the Abigail from New…

Alfred Hawes Stone

  Alfred Hawes Stone came out to the Swan River colony just a few months after Stirling had arrived in 1829. He took up photography in his later years after three decades as a prominent colony lawyer and Supreme Court Registrar. Many of his photos have survived and present a clear window into Perth in…